Pagglait nearly gets things right. Nearly.

There is something about films that tug at the heartstrings of being somewhat real and somewhat believable. While I’m a big fan of suspension of disbelief and hot cinematic sex (a la his highness the Duke of Hastings), I also find myself enjoying cinematic moments which are nothing but painfully raw and real. If I had a Bombay cinema fantasy league team, it would include the waiter from Oye Lucky! Lucky Oye!


As a Formula One fan and a new media scholar, DTS 3 is as good as a wet dream may look for me.

It is not live television, it is not reality television, and it is also not a wholly dramatized series; Drive To Survive (DTS) is a unique television experience. A round-up of a season of Formula One, with some heart; it’s a bit of everything, but more than anything else, it is a show with some sense of self-awareness. …


Charles Sobhraj is a man who wanted to be known. There’s no better place to start than The Serpent to take that bait.

The first time I decided to travel to Thailand on an advance notice of 9 hours to my family, I contacted the only person I had known — an old friend who had spent her childhood and late teen years in the country. Among the other handy information she parted, she asked me in loud and clear words to stay the fuck away from anyone who tried to talk to me, especially if that individual looked like they’re from the Indian subcontinent and/or offered to sell me gems. …


Gratitude is an attitude. Thank you for not making a mess out of the first televised discourse on #MeToo

There’s something interesting at play with the way the Indian OTT originals and the hosting platforms are conceptualizing our lives for the screen. I would put emphasis on “Indian women” but I know #MenLivesMatter and all that. Plus, women’s day is over and so is our token 24 hours window to feel good on social media (also, nobody got me a single chocolate — the disadvantages of being self-employed).

If Alt-Balaji is going down with transgression (Dev DD, Gandii Baat) — a self-righteous follow-up from their years of Baniya Goth television and representation of women in India, and Hotstar is…


A visual illustration of your condition after you’ve finished streaming the film, only if you manage to finish streaming the film.

(This review contains spoilers. However, I promise it can’t spoil the film for you. The film does that damage to itself.)

The Girl On The Train (2021; dir Ribhu Dasgupta) is not a film, it’s a torture mechanism. There should be compulsory viewing of the film for the inmates at the jails across the country, especially for those who are held on account of UAPA. If this film is made to be a compulsory watch for those in the police and the judicial custody waiting for their bail, then there won’t ever be any kind of criticism against the government…


Inject Rosamund Pike’s voice over in my veins. I need that monologue as a daily reminder to be just as effortlessly fatal as she is.

If a film starts with the protagonist’s monologue, it sets certain expectations which tend to dictate the mood of the rest of the screenplay. In the case of I Care A Lot (2021), Rosamund Pike’s strong shoulders carry that burden through and through.

It starts from the first frame onwards; she tells you about the bullshit statements that powerful and successful people (also known as the rich) endorse and how it’s misleading to those who are trying their best to make it (with hard work). …


Now’s a good time for you to make peace with the fact that Netflix India is mildly obsessed with the phrase ‘big fat Indian wedding’.

Originally published on Scrollstack here.

What the Barjatya’s were to Bombay cinema in the 90s, Netflix India is hell-bent upon creating the same with the OTT platforms in the ’20s. The revisionist version of new India, and subsequently, Indian “millennial” trends from this epoch has made for a solid chunk of Netflix India’s original programming material since 2020. Netflix’s infamous Indian Matchmaking (2020) was the precursor to erecting the structure of a new Indian figure; the non-sequitur follow-up The Big Day (2021) is their effort in cementing that new Indian figure rooted in tradition and contemporaneity. …


The only one book that has truly addressed my unspeakable grief — ones that friends could not be there for and family was too engrossed with dealing with their own.

“I don’t know what to do with it…With all the love I have for her. I don’t know where to put it now.”

This scene from Fleabag (2016–2019) stays rent-free in my head. For the uninitiated, the protagonist (played by the creator- Phoebe Waller-Bridge), announces out loud to her best friend (Boo) at her mother’s service.

It struck a chord with my heart and it got me thinking about all the ones we have lost and how most of us struggle to give that piece of heart to someone else. That loss is never fully compensated and it’s always hanging…


There are not very many things I could list down from 2015 that I did, which could be stated with pride. The committee at my university cleared my proposal, which meant I got a green signal to write 50k unique and meaningful words. Research scholar in the stage of making is a bad place to be, especially if you don’t live on campus. You’re swayed away by the numerous things piled for you at home besides your readings and groundwork. While my colleagues were giving lectures, presenting papers, I was writing blog posts for friends, selling the furniture at our…


A long time ago, an old friend (who is now an academic success story) took me through the unwritten manual on men. According to her, creatures under the age of 30 were not to be taken seriously, for a whole bunch of reasons. I’m going to at this point announce my departure from that statement, without having to establish those reasons (because I’m not an academic success story). The idea is, men undergo several changes with regard to their maturity and are the best over the age of 30. By then they’ve had their fill of stupidity and naivety and…

Broom Hilda

Pop culture maven, loves good grecian nose.

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